Inula Royleana
Midwest Gardening
Rudbeckia hirta

Back to Index

Back to Perennials

Home Page

Rudbeckia hirta, commonly known as Coneflower or Black-eyed Susan, are a tough and sturdy perennial that blooms for long periods

Rudbeckia is a genus made up of 23 species, commonly known as Black-eyed Susans, Brown-eyed Susans or Gloriosa Daisy (annual or bienniel).  Rudbeckia may be annuals, biennials or perennials, all of which are native to the meadowlands and woodlands of North America.  Rudbeckia blooms are typically daisy like flowers, sometimes with slightly reflexed (drooping) petals and a prominent cone (center).  The flower petals of the Rudbeckia are often some shade of yellow with dark or black contrasting centers.

(Note:  Purple Coneflower is an Echinacea purpurea.  Echinacea and Rudbeckia are two entirely different genus.  Coneflower are Rudbeckia genus.)

 

Rudbeckia hirta are easy to grow, virtually pest free and wonderful in fresh flower arrangements.  Rudbeckia are an excellent perennial for sunny gardens but will bloom fairly well in part shade.  Although they prefer a moderately fertile soil they are tolerant of clay also.  They are very tolerant of heat and humidity, but prefer some supplemental water in periods of extended drought.  Blooming will also be improved when supplied with adequate water as well as full sun.  In the hotter regions Rudbeckia coneflower will appreciate some afternoon sun and are quite happy with part shade.  Rudbeckia hirta are short lived perennial that typically survive up to three years.  They are perhaps better considered a biennial or an annual in colder regions that self seeds quite readily, and is considered invasive by some.  Diligent deadheading will prevent self seeding and will also encourage additional blooming.  If you prefer to leave the last blooms of autumn to go to seed, you will enjoy not only the interesting seed cones through winter but also the birds that enjoy the seeds. Plants can also be propagated by division.  Rudbeckia plants that become taller or bushier than desired can be cut back to about 6” to generate fresh growth.

Note that Rudbeckia are sometimes sold as annuals in cold regions, zone 3 and 4.  Although they are a perennial or bienniel, they may not mature in time in your region to develop seeds.  Be sure to question your garden center if they are sold as annuals and be aware that the Rudbeckia may or may not reseed in your garden.  Or you can learn to collect and germinate seeds yourself.

Rudbeckia species hirta are distinguished by the “hair” that covers its leaves and stems.  It is the largest group of Rudbeckia with many wonderful hybrids from tall to dwarf.  The species plant is the true Black-eyed Susan but there are many varieties available.  Rudbeckia tribola are the true Brown-eyed Susan that has less hairy foliage.

Rudbeckia hirtaRudbeckia hirt by Rick mayfield

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/bienniel
  • Height: 2-3’
  • Spread:  1-2’
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium to moist, will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched
  • Bloom Time: June through September
  • Bloom Color: Yellow to orange-yellow
  • Bloom Form:  8-20 daisy like petals with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured gray green leavesRudbeckia hirta by Peter Schauer are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 3,4,5,6,7

Rudbeckia hirta produces 3” daisy like flowers in bright golden yellow to orange-yellow.  This is the true Black-eyed Susan species plant.  The large flowers have up to twice the petals of the Brown-eyed Susan surrounding a dark chocolate brown center cone.  The flower petals reflex slightly when fully opened.  Blooms typically appear by early summer, completing its major bloom period in about a month.  Blooms will often sporadically appear until fall.  Black-eyed Susan is also a short lived perennial that can be considered a biennial.   It self seeds readily, which can be minimized by deadheading spent blooms.  Although this Rudbeckia is short lived it will perpetuate by seed and can be naturalized easily.  Flowers left on the plant will attract birds as the seeds develop.  Strong upright stems are rough and bristly, 1 to 3 feet tall with 3-7” long slightly hairy leaves.  Deer are not at all fond of they bristly and hairy foliage and will generally pass by a Rudbeckia for other treats.  Black-eyed Susan are at home in a cutting garden or a wildflower garden.  It is also somewhat salt tolerant and can be used in roadside gardens.

There are several Rudbeckia hirta cultivars with large bold flowers of reds, orange, yellow, bronze and bicolors.

The species Rudbeckia fulgida (Orange Coneflower) is quite similar in appearance, but usually blooms later, and has style-tips that are shorter and more rounded.

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Autumn Colors’Rudbeckia hirta in 'Autumn Colors' by Laiane

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 20-24”’
  • Spread:  10-12”’
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched
  • Bloom Time: June through September
  • Bloom Color: Yellow gold, orange, bronze red with a brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  8-20 daisy like petals with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 5,6,7,8

‘Autumn Colors’ is a Rudbecki hybrid which is also a short lived perennial.  Each plant may survive up to a few seasons but will self seed to perpetuate the plant in your garden.  ‘Autumn Colors’ blooms produce a stunning range of color from yellow gold, orange and bronze red, the deeper colors surrounding the eye and blending to golden yellows at the petal tips.  Each plant produces slightly different coloring.  The flowers are large, 5-7” diameter, with a brown eye, borne singly on strong stems.  ‘Autumn Colors’ will begin flowering in late June or July and generally continue until frost.  In the warmest regions it may continue blooming into winter.  Deadheading spent flowers will encourage additional blooming but will also limit self seeding.  The final blooms of the season can be left to seed if you want to encourage additional plants to replace those that may perish over winter.  The plant typically produces flowers the first year.  ‘Autumn Colors’ is a compact, well branched perennial that produces blooms abundantly.  A smaller stature makes ‘Autumn Colors’ ideal for front of the border and small scaled gardens.  The striking bloom color also makes an excellent choice for a specimen plant and cut flower.  Do not over water or over fertilize.  Feeding annually with a slow release fertilizer is best.  Although not winter hardy in colder zones, it can be grown as a bienniel if allowed to self seed.

‘Autumn Colors’ has some similarity to ‘Rustic Colors’ but with a greater range of strong autumn colors and blooms just a bit later that ‘Rustic Colors’.

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Cherokee Sunset’Rudbecia Cherokee Sunset  by Faith

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 24-36”’
  • Spread:  12-24”’
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched
  • Bloom Time: July through frost
  • Bloom Color: Yellow, orange, bronze, red and mahogany with a brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  Semi-double to double with dark brown center
  • Rudbeckia 'Cherokee Sunset' by Dwight SiplerFoliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 4,5,6,7,8

‘Cherokee Sunset’ Rudbeckia flowers are bold, beautiful and variable.  The 4” flowers may be double to semi-double with variable shadings of yellow, orange, bronze, red and mahogany with a dark mahogany eye.  Blooming profusely for weeks they make a stunning statement no matter where you plant them.  ‘Cherokee Sunset’ will bloom further into autumn than ‘Autumn Colors’ and ‘Goldsturm’.  Although the plant is quite drought tolerant, regular watering will ensure the best and most prolific blooming.  Part shade will also reduce the flower size and number of blooms.  The flowers can sometimes be more similar to a Gaillardia than a daisy when they produce full double blooms.  This Rudbeckia may winter well in zone 4, but if it doesn’t it will self seed to perpetuate the plant in your gardens.    ‘Cherokee Sunset’ is a short lived perennial or bienniel, but self seeds freely.  Deadheading faded flowers will neaten the plant and encourage additional blooming, but to perpetuate the perennial in your garden the last blooms of the season should be left to sow seeds. Purchased seeds can be sown in early winter to early spring.  The plant will grow quickly and flower in the first season.  The plant is well branched with strong 30” stems for great cut flowers.

 

Rudbeckia Chim Chiminee by Marj JolyRudbeckia hirta ‘Chim Chiminee’

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 24-30”
  • Spread:  24”
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched
  • Bloom Time: July through frost
  • Bloom Color: Yellow gold, bronze, mahogany blend, with a purple brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  Semi double quilled petals with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  NoneRudbeckia hirta Chim Chiminee
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.  Divide mature clumps every 2-3 years in early spring.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 3,4,5,6,7,8,9

The uniquely quilled petals of ‘Chim Chiminee’ are a mix and blend of wonderful fall colors.  Each bloom is a varied blend of yellow gold, bronze, orange red and mahogany.  The large full flowers with broad variation in coloring creates an interesting cut flower arrangement.  This Rudbeckia hybrid will do fairly well in light shade but does prefer full sun.  Strong stems are well branched with great weather resistance making a superb garden perennial.  ‘Chim Chiminee’ is a short lived perennial or bienniel, but self seeds freely.  Deadheading faded flowers will neaten the plant and encourage additional blooming, but to perpetuate the perennial in your garden the last blooms of the season should be left to sow seeds. Purchased seeds can be sown in early winter to early spring.  The plant will grow quickly and flower in the first season.  A showy perennial of mid height, ‘Chim Chiminee’ is an excellent choice for containers, borders and naturalized gardens.  When allowed to self seed, a beautiful array of bloom colors will give the appearance of several varieties. 

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Denver Daisy’Rudbeckia hirta Denver Daisy by John

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 18-24”’
  • Spread:  12-18”’
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched
  • Bloom Time: June through September
  • Bloom Color: Yellow gold, orange, bronze red with a brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  Semi double daisy like petals with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 5,6,7,8,9

‘Denver Daisy’ Rudbeckia was named to commemorate the 150th anniversary of Denver Colorado.  It was bred from the native species plant Rudbeckia hirta and the cultivar ‘Prairie Sun’.  The bright yellow blooms are blended with a rich mahogany red halo surrounding a brown center and are at least 4” diameter.  It blooms profusely all summer creating a bright spectacular display, one of the longer blooming Rudbeckia.  .  ‘Denver Daisy’ is a short lived perennial or bienniel, but self seeds freely.  Deadheading faded flowers will neaten the plant and encourage additional blooming, but to perpetuate the perennial in your garden the last blooms of the season should be left to sow seeds. Purchased seeds can be sown in early winter to early spring.  The plant will grow quickly and flower in the first season.  The stems are strong and well branched and the plant is quite heat resistant.  But in the hottest regions it will enjoy some afternoon shade.  Be sure to water at least weekly in extended hot periods, but do not over water.  An excellent flower for containers, borders or naturalized gardens.  Stunning in a fresh floral arrangement.

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Indian Summer’Rudbeckia hirta Indian Summer by Robert Couse-Baker

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 2-3’
  • Spread:  1-2’
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched
  • Bloom Time: June through frost
  • Bloom Color: Bright yellow petal rays that deepen toward the center, with a purple brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  8-20 daisy like petals with dark brown centerRudbeckia 'Indian Summer
  • Foliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 3,4,5,6,7,8

‘Indian Summer’ Rudbeckia’s bright yellow blooms are extra large, 6-9” in diameter and blooms freely all summer.  The classic Black-eyed Susan flowers are produced singly on strong stiff stems that are one to three feet tall, a bit taller than most Rudbeckia varieties.  The plant is well branched and bushy and the foliage turns slightly mahogany in fall.  A strong and vigorous plant, ‘Indian Summer’ is quite weather resistant.  The plant will bloom in the first season if planted early in the spring.  ‘Indian Summer’ is a short lived perennial or bienniel, but self seeds freely.  Deadheading faded flowers will neaten the plant and encourage additional blooming, but to perpetuate the perennial in your garden the last blooms of the season should be left to sow seeds.  The bold color and large flowers of ‘Indian Summer’ are perfect for long lasting cut flowers or dried flowers and make a bold statement in your garden.  Plant in drifts, groups, or singly as an accent.  Rudbeckia will also naturalize easily.

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Irish Eyes’Rudbecki hirta Irish Eyes by Bill Murray

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 20-36”
  • Spread:  24”
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched and upright
  • Bloom Time: June through frost
  • Bloom Color: Bright yellow petal rays that deepen toward the center, with a purple brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  8-20 daisy like petals with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every 2-3 weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 3,4,5,6,7,8,9

‘Irish Eyes’ is a very unique Rudbeckia flower that is ideal for planting where it can be appreciated from close up.  The very large flowers have bright golden petals that are a deeper golden orange near the center, surrounding a green center disk.  The 5” flowers are quite captivating and a bit more subtle than the typical Black-eyed Susan.  Flowers are borne singly on 24” strong stems.  A container full of ‘Irish Eyes’ is perfect at an entry or on the patio, they do very well in a container.  Profuse blooming continues for weeks, removing spent flowers will encourage continued blooming.  Flowers left to dry at the end of season will reseed to replace plants that may be lost over winter.  ‘Irish Eyes’ will bloom the first year if started from seed early in spring or the previous autumn.  The plant has a nice upright form and is a nice size for front or middle of the border and mixes well with taller bold Rudbeckia or perennials.  Be sure to give ‘Irish Eyes’ regular water but do not over water.  If using water soluble fertilizer, apply every two to three weeks.

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Maya’Rudbeckia hirta 'Maya'

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 10-18”
  • Spread:  10-12
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched, compact dwarf
  • Bloom Time: June through frost
  • Bloom Color: Yellow with a brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  Fully double with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured gray green leaves are lance shaped and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.  Divide mature clumps every 2-3 years in early spring.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 5,6,7,8,9

‘Maya’ Rudbeckia is a delightful dwarf hybrid with brilliant gold blooms.  Fully double 4 inch blooms are more reminiscent of garden mums or marigold than daisies.  The compact plants are suitable for any garden or the front of the border.  The full well branched habit and excellent performance in the garden will make it one of your favorites.  Sturdy 20 inch stems will give you lovely cut flowers for fresh arrangements.   The plant will bloom in the first season if planted early in the spring.  ‘Maya’ is a short lived perennial or bienniel, but self seeds freely.  Deadheading faded flowers will neaten the plant and encourage additional blooming, but to perpetuate the perennial in your garden the last blooms of the season should be left to sow seeds

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Prairie Sun’Rudbeckia hirta Prarie Sun by Jane

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 2-3’
  • Spread:  1-2’
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, upright
  • Bloom Time: June through frost
  • Bloom Color: Bright yellow petal rays that deepen to golden orange toward the center, with a green eye.Rudbeckia hirta Prarie Sun by Rachel James
  • Bloom Form:  8-20 large daisy like petals with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, up to 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 5,6,7,8,9

‘Prairie Sun’ Rudbeckia is nicely upright with 3 foot strong stem.  Large 5” inch flowers are borne singly on each stem all summer. ‘Prairie Sun’s’ flower petals are a cheery bright golden orange with yellow tips, radiating from a prominent light green center button cone.  This Rudbeckia loves to bloom and will bloom even more profusely if the spent flowers are deadheaded.   The plant will bloom in the first season if planted early in the spring.  ‘Prairie Sun’ is a short lived perennial or bienniel, but self seeds freely.  Deadheading faded flowers will neaten the plant and encourage additional blooming, but to perpetuate the perennial in your garden the last blooms of the season should be left to sow seeds.  Plant ‘Prairie Sun’ in a sunny border to create bright waves of color or as a cheery accent plant that remains fresh through the season. A stunning cut or dried flower.

Rudbeckia hirta ‘Tiger Eye’Rudebecki hirta 'Tiger Eye'

  • Common Name:  Black-eyed Susan, Gloriosa Daisy, Yellow Ox-eye Daisy
  • Plant Type:  Herbaceous perennial/biennial
  • Height: 18-24’
  • Spread:  16-20”
  • Sun/Shade Requirements:  Full sun
  • Water Requirements:  Medium , will tolerate short periods of drought.
  • Soil Requirements:  Average, well drained, prefers organically rich moist soil but is adaptable.  Tolerant of clay soil.
  • Growth Habit:  Clump forming, well branched
  • Bloom Time: June through frostRudbeckia hirta Tiger Eye by green thumbs
  • Bloom Color: Bright yellow orange petal rays that deepen toward the center, with a dark brown eye.
  • Bloom Form:  Single to semi double daisy like petals with dark brown center
  • Foliage:  Rough textured dark green leaves are lance shaped, 7” long and slightly hairy
  • Fragrance:  None
  • Pest and Disease Resistance:  No problems of note, somewhat susceptible to powdery mildew
  • Fertilize: Work a slow release balanced fertilizer into the soil before planting, or apply a water soluble fertilizer every few weeks.
  • Maintenance: Deadhead to encourage blooming and to minimize self seeding.  Cut back to the ground in late winter, wait for spring to allow seeding.
  • Other:  Attracts butterflies and birds.  Deer resistant.
  • Hardiness:  Zone 6,7,8, 9

‘Tiger Eye’ Rudbeckia is a hybrid with superior uniformity in its blooms.  Large 4” blooms are semi double in bright orange gold with a deeper gold center halo and a brown button eye.  ‘Tiger Eye’ may be the most prolific, reliable and uniform bloomer of the Rudbeckia hirta hybrids.  Give it full sun, weekly water and enough space for good air circulation and the plant will bloom nonstop for weeks and weeks.  The resistance to powdery mildew is improved in this hybrid which does aid the blooming.  A well branched, uniform plant creates a pleasing appearance.  In most cases ‘Tiger Eye’ will be a reseeding annual but will often survive winter in warmer regions.  In ideal conditions ‘Tiger Eye’ will live at least 3 years.  Some afternoon shade in the hottest regions should benefit the plant without sacrificing blooms.  The plant will bloom in the first season if planted early in the spring.  ‘Tiger Eye’ is a short lived perennial or bienniel, but self seeds freely.  Deadheading faded flowers will neaten the plant and encourage additional blooming, but to perpetuate the perennial in your garden the last blooms of the season should be left to sow seeds.

top of page                                                   previous perennial                                            next Rudbeckia

Rudbeckia hirta
find us on facebook

Facebook Feed Preview

Information, Articles, How To

Foundation Planting

Dappled Willow

Preparing for Winter

Designing Your Gardens and Landscape

Garden and Landscape Accents

Questions Answered

Links

Site Map