Inula Royleana
Midwest Gardening
Fall Frost Tolerant

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There are many summer into fall blooming annuals and perennials that will tolerate early frost.

Early Fall Garden by Wonderlane

These annuals and perennials that continue blooming well into autumn will tolerate a light frost, but not repeatedly and not a hard frost or freeze.  Growing these in your garden will give you colorful blooms in summer and add to your fall blooming display.

PERENNIALS AND BIENNIALS WITH BLOOMS THAT WILL TOLERATE FROST:

Coneflower blooms are likely to survive a frost.

Dianthus (pinks) blooms will survive frost.

Foxglove blooms are likely to survive a frost.

Hollyhock blooms are likely to survive a frost.

Larkspur blooms are likely to survive a frost.

Phlox blooms may survive a light frost.

Rudbeckia (Black eyed Susan) blooms will survive frost.

Salvia blooms are likely to survive a frost.

Shasta Daisy blooms are likely to survive a frost.

Verbena blooms are likely to survive a frost.

ANNUALS WITH BLOOMS THAT WILL TOLERATE FROST:

Bachelor’s Button are cold tolerant and so are the seedlings.  You can direct sow bachelor’s button seeds about 2-3 weeks before the last spring frost and bloom all summer.  Bachelor’s button may likely even survive as well as pansies.

Calendula (pot marigold or English Marigold) are cold tolerant and can be planted before the last spring frost and they will bloom all season.

Coreopsis, the annual are cold tolerant and can be planted 2-3 weeks before the last spring frost and they will bloom all season.

Gazania are somewhat similar to Gerbera Daisies but are frost tolerant.  The flowers will close at night and heavily overcast days, but bloom repeatedly all season if deadheaded.

Geranium, especially those in window boxes or in containers up on the deck, will keep blooming beyond the first frost.  When planted in the ground they will likely survive a light frost.

Godetia are cold tolerant and can be planted before the last spring frost.  They will bloom all season

Larkspur are a cool season annual, cold tolerant and so are the seedlings.  You can direct sow larkspur seeds about 2-3 weeks before the last spring frost and they will bloom all season.

Marigold seeds are cold tolerant so you can direct sow marigold seeds about 1-2 weeks before the last spring frost.  But the plant will take a while to grow and bloom, once it does it will bloom all season.

Osteopermum (African Daisy)  are cold tolerant and can be planted about 2-3 weeks before the last spring frost and they will bloom all season.

Petunia, especially those in window boxes or in containers up on the deck, will keep blooming beyond the first frost.  When planted in the ground they will likely survive a light frost.

Poppy are cold tolerant and so are the seedlings.  You can direct sow poppy seeds about 2-3 weeks before the last spring frost and they will bloom all season.

Snapdragon love cool climates and will tolerate light frosts.  The seedlings are also cold tolerant.  Snapdragon looks terrific in fall too.  You can direct sow snapdragon seeds about 2-3 weeks before the last spring frost.

Sunflower seeds are cold tolerant so you can direct sow sunflower seeds about 1-2 weeks before the last spring frost. But the plant will take a while to grow and bloom.

Sweet Alyssum seeds are cold tolerant.  You can direct sow alyssum seeds about 1-2 weeks before the last spring frost, but it will take a while for the plant to grow and bloom.  Or buy plants and use them as a great filler with tall potted flowers or garden edging.

Sweet Peas are cold tolerant and so are the seedlings.  You can direct sow sweet pea seeds about 2-3 weeks before the last spring frost.

Verbena are cold tolerant and bloom very well in cool weather.  But they will also be blooming and healthy all summer right through fall frosts.

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